Great Knot 7YRYB was seen again

A report from David Chan (volunteer for Coastal China Survey) on 12/5/2018:

It was a sunny day after a few days of rain and disappointment. Not many Great Knots were seen on the mudflats at Lianyungang for the past few days. Hebo brought us to this last site hoping to find more knots there, especially a Great Knot carrying a solar-paneled satellite transmitter (also called a PTT – Platform Terminal Transmitter -, or simply “sat-tag”). From its location data we knew it was there. Fortunately, we counted a few thousand Great Knots foraging near shellfish farms. So besides continuing the foraging study of Great Knots by filming them, the next task, obviously, was to find our sat-tagged friend, the bird carrying the satellite transmitter, who led us all the way to this site.

Throughout the whole day, we scanned different flocks of Great Knots hoping to find it. The light turned softer at the golden hour and sunset was near but we did not want to give up on scanning. In a flock of resting knots, two Great Knots with colour-rings caught our attention. Looking closely, we saw an antenna attached on one of them. Immediately we knew that this was the bird!

This sat-tagged Great Knot at Lianyungang was coded 7YRYB. 7YRYB was banded with a yellow flag (Roebuck Bay, Australia) and four colour-rings (Yellow-Red-Yellow-Blue, so YRYB). 7YRYB was a she (identified by DNA techniques) banded 29/09/2016 at Richards Point in Roebuck Bay and fitted with a satellite tag. Yet, her migration journey was not ordinary. After banding, she flew two thousand km to Papua New Guinea and stayed there for the whole breeding season of 2017 (see Chris Hassell’s blog on 19/04/2018).

Her northward migration this year started on April 10 with a four thousand km direct flight to Taiwan. Surprisingly, one local birder Mr Lin Jer An was able to photograph her on April 16th and took a video the next day (see Chris Hassell’s blog). It is always delightful to see photos of birds carrying a PTT tag doing fine. She left Taiwan around April 20th and arrived at Jiangsu Province on the next day.  After a few days, she flew north to Lianyungang and we saw it on May 8th.

It was a joyful moment watching the seemingly fattening 7YRYB feeding at Lianyungang. Direct observation and foraging videos help us understand the birds’ condition and behaviour (you can watch the video above). Unfortunately, the building of a big port nearby might affect this section of mudflat and the thousands of shorebirds that stop here during their migration. An all too familiar issue in coastal China but some good news is also out now (more information in Wader Study, also in Mandarin, and on mongabay.com).

Her migration journey was amazing, from Australia to Papua New Guinea, and from Papua New Guinea to China. She revealed some interesting movements and brought people caring and studying shorebirds along the flyways together, from Australia, Alaska, Taiwan and China. Migratory birds like 7YRYB connect scientists, conservationists and bird-lovers. We hope the stories of 7YRYB may raise awareness about their survival and the threats they are facing.

We wish her all the best on the coming journey and breeding season. Godspeed.

David Chan

12/05/2018 (World Migratory Bird Day 2018)

[David works with Ginny (Ying Chi Chan) from Royal NIOZ Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and University of Groningen, The Netherlands].

Please note this article is derived from raw data and has had no checking or statistical analysis applied to the PTT data.

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